Keynotes

Three prominent and excellent keynote speakers will provide high-quality contributions on different approaches to scaling-up professional development in math and science education.

Alan Schoenfeld (University of Berkeley, US) on What Counts in Professional Development, and Can We Conduct PD at Scale?

Olaf Köller (Leibniz Institute for Science Education, Germany) on Teachers professional development: Lessons learnt from a large-scale German PD programme

Michiel Doorman (Utrecht University, the Netherlands) on Problem Solving, Scaling up and Systemic Change


Alan Schoenfeld: What Counts in Professional Development, and Can We Conduct PD at Scale?

Download: Keynote_Alan Schoenfeld

There are at least two major challenges in building professional development programs intended to support large numbers of teachers. The first is the question of what teachers should know, in order to be able to help students become effective mathematical thinkers and problem solvers. The second is the question of how to go to scale – how to create opportunities for large numbers of teachers to experience the kinds of support that will make a difference.

In this talk I present a theoretical framework for professional development, called Teaching for Robust Understanding (or, TRU). I argue that there are five dimensions of importance when examining learning environments. All five dimensions are important, in that any one is lacking, students will not learn well; and all five together are sufficient to produce powerful learning. The challenge, then, is to find ways to help large numbers of teachers develop the relevant skills and understandings. This is made more complex by the fact that different nations have different forms and traditions of professional development. I will discuss ways in which TRU can be used to build professional learning communities and go to scale, even in different cultural contexts.

Biography

Alan SchoenfeldAlan Schoenfeld is a Professor of Education and Mathematics at the University of California at Berkeley. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and a Laureate of the education honor society Kappa Delta Pi; he has served as President of AERA and vice President of the U. S. National Academy of Education. He holds the International Commission on Mathematics Instruction’s Klein Medal, the highest international distinction in mathematics education; AERA's Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education award, AERA’s highest honor; and the Mathematical Association of America’s Mary P. Dolciani award, given to a pure or applied mathematician for distinguished contributions to the mathematical education of K-16 students.

Schoenfeld has written, edited, or co-edited more than two hundred pieces on thinking and learning, including twenty-two books. His most recent book, How we Think, provides detailed models of human decision making in complex situations such as teaching. His current R&D projects involve understanding and supporting teaching that produces students who are powerful thinkers.


Olaf Köller: Teachers professional development: Lessons learnt from a large-scale German PD programme

How long it takes to change teachers: Lessons learnt from a German Program on TPD

Download: Keynote_Olaf Koeller

Findings from international large-scale assessment like TIMSS initiated many reforms in the German school system. One of the most prominent reforms was the so-called SINUS-project (Initiative to improve the quality of teaching in math and science) which started at the end of the nineteen-nineties in secondary schools and was then (starting in 2004) continued in primary schools. Based on scientific knowledge from educational research, SINUS strived to enhance teaching quality by initiating teacher collaboration in schools. Particularly the SINUS program in primary school (comprising approx. 900 schools) was intensively evaluated using a multi-method approach with teacher and student questionnaires, classroom videos, interviews, document analyses, and achievement tests. Qualitative content analyses of documents delivered by schools provide information of implementation quality which differed substantially among schools. With respect to achievement, 80 SINUS schools participated in the national assessment study in 2011. The data allows a comparison of SINUS students at the end of grade 4 and their classmates from a nationally representative sample. Using propensity score matching, effects of SINUS on students’ math and science competencies were analyzed. Findings suggest that after controlling for many student and school characteristics, SINUS students outperformed their classmates at regular schools. The difference, however, was quite small (d = 0.20), indicating that school reforms take very long time to have (small) effects on student outcomes.

Biography

Olaf KoellerOlaf Köller is currently director of the Department of Educational Research at the Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), IPN’s scientific managing director, and full professor of educational research at the University of Kiel, Germany. Till September 2009, he was founding director of the German Institute for Educational Progress at Humboldt Uniersity, Berlin (IQB). After graduation in psychology in 1991 he started his scientific career at IPN. In 1996 he changed to the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, where he finished his dissertation (Ph.D.) in 1997. In 2002 he accepted the offer of a full professorship at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. In 2004 he changed to Humboldt University, Berlin. As a full professor of educational research and the founding director of IQB, Olaf Köller was responsible for the national assessment of educational progress in Germany. Aside from his activities in academic assessment, his major research interests are reciprocal effects of motivation and achievement, the development of academic interests and their effects on achievement, educational and occupational choices. Olaf Köller has published more than 200 national and international journal articles, book chapters and monographs.


Michiel Doorman: Problem Solving, Scaling up and Systemic Change

Download: Keynote_Michiel Doorman

To equip our students to act as informed citizens in a rapidly changing world we need more attention for problem solving skills in mathematics education. In school, students are rarely required to tackle non-routine problems of the type that are common in the workplace. In most classrooms the focus remains on individual technical fluency rather than on developing collaborative problem solving approaches. The question is how to innovate education in order to meet these new needs? Local, national and even European projects try to tackle this challenge. However, it is still unclear how the process of the implementation of such a reform may take place, and which factors are decisive in its success or failure during scaling up. This talk will discuss and exemplify some of the tools and processes we need to create in order to support teachers and to foster scaling up innovation. The challenge is one of design and of communicating best practices on all levels involved in scaling up. We will discuss the design of example materials that support reformed pedagogies, as well as the travel, and the adaptation, of the ideas behind these materials along curriculum documents, textbooks and high stake assessments.

Biography

Malcolm SwanDr. Michiel Doorman works as a researcher and teacher trainer at the Freudenthal Institute of Utrecht University. His research interests are context-based mathematics education and coherency between mathematics and science learning. In the past, he has been involved in the Comenius project Compass (developing interdisciplinary teaching units) and the FP7 project Primas (teaching materials and professional development units for IBL in science and mathematics). Currently, he is involved in the FP7 project Mascil (inquiry-based science and mathematics with workplace contexts). In addition to these European projects, Michiel Doorman also participates in various national projects on designing educational materials and connecting science and mathematics, with a special focus on context-based tasks and inquiry-based learning. He is member of the board of the Dutch association for mathematics teachers.

Dr. Michiel Doorman works as a researcher and teacher trainer at the Freudenthal Institute of Utrecht University. His research interests are context-based mathematics education and coherency between mathematics and science learning. In the past, he has been involved in the Comenius project Compass (developing interdisciplinary teaching units) and the FP7 project Primas (teaching materials and professional development units for IBL in science and mathematics). Currently, he is involved in the FP7 project Mascil (inquiry-based science and mathematics with workplace contexts). In addition to these European projects, Michiel Doorman also participates in various national projects on designing educational materials and connecting science and mathematics, with a special focus on context-based tasks and inquiry-based learning. He is member of the board of the Dutch association for mathematics teachers.

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The project mascil has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement n°320693